Publications

Our publications are listed below.

Books

  1. Scopatz, Anthony, and Kathryn D. Huff. 2015. Effective Computation in Physics. 1St edition. O’Reilly Media.

    Effective Computation in Physics is a handy guide to the types of problems you run into with computational physics—such as version control, bash scripts, object orientation, large databases, and parallel machines. The authors provide detailed scientific computing motivations, clear and concise tutorials, and references to further information about each of the topics presented.This book fills the existing training gap for students and scientists who conduct physics in a world where simulations have replaced desktop experiments and sophisticated data traversing algorithms have replaced pen and paper analysis.Provides a central source that ties various pieces of computational physics togetherContains coverage of the Python programming language aimed toward physicistsHelps you properly analyze and compellingly visualize your dataIncludes chapters on hot topics like NumPy and HDF5

    @book{scopatz_effective_2015,
      edition = {1st edition},
      title = {Effective {Computation} in {Physics}},
      isbn = {978-1-4919-0153-3},
      language = {English},
      publisher = {O'Reilly Media},
      author = {Scopatz, Anthony and Huff, Kathryn D.},
      month = may,
      year = {2015}
    }
    

Book Chapters

  1. Huff, Kathryn. 2017. “Case Study: Cyclus Project.” In The Practice of Reproducible Research, edited by Justin Kitzes, Fatma Imamoglu, and Daniel Turek, 1st ed. Vol. 1. University of California, Berkeley: University of California Press.
    @incollection{huff_case_2017,
      address = {University of California, Berkeley},
      edition = {1},
      title = {Case {Study}: {Cyclus} {Project}},
      volume = {1},
      booktitle = {The {Practice} of {Reproducible} {Research}},
      publisher = {University of California Press},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn},
      editor = {Kitzes, Justin and Imamoglu, Fatma and Turek, Daniel},
      year = {2017}
    }
    
  2. ———. 2017. “Lessons Learned.” In The Practice of Reproducible Research, edited by Justin Kitzes, Fatma Imamoglu, and Daniel Turek, 1st ed. Vol. 1. University of California, Berkeley: University of California Press.
    @incollection{huff_lessons_2017,
      address = {University of California, Berkeley},
      edition = {1},
      title = {Lessons {Learned}},
      volume = {1},
      booktitle = {The {Practice} of {Reproducible} {Research}},
      publisher = {University of California Press},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn},
      editor = {Kitzes, Justin and Imamoglu, Fatma and Turek, Daniel},
      year = {2017}
    }
    

Journal Articles

  1. Huff, Kathryn D., Matthew J. Gidden, Robert W. Carlsen, Robert R. Flanagan, Meghan B. McGarry, Arrielle C. Opotowsky, Erich A. Schneider, Anthony M. Scopatz, and Paul P. H. Wilson. 2016. “Fundamental Concepts in the Cyclus Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation Framework.” Advances in Engineering Software 94 (April): 46–59. doi:10.1016/j.advengsoft.2016.01.014.

    As nuclear power expands, technical, economic, political, and environmental analyses of nuclear fuel cycles by simulators increase in importance. To date, however, current tools are often fleet-based rather than discrete and restrictively licensed rather than open source. Each of these choices presents a challenge to modeling fidelity, generality, efficiency, robustness, and scientific transparency. The Cyclus nuclear fuel cycle simulator framework and its modeling ecosystem incorporate modern insights from simulation science and software architecture to solve these problems so that challenges in nuclear fuel cycle analysis can be better addressed. A summary of the Cyclus fuel cycle simulator framework and its modeling ecosystem are presented. Additionally, the implementation of each is discussed in the context of motivating challenges in nuclear fuel cycle simulation. Finally, the current capabilities of Cyclus are demonstrated for both open and closed fuel cycles.

    @article{huff_fundamental_2016,
      title = {Fundamental concepts in the {Cyclus} nuclear fuel cycle simulation framework},
      volume = {94},
      issn = {0965-9978},
      url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965997816300229},
      doi = {10.1016/j.advengsoft.2016.01.014},
      urldate = {2016-02-12},
      journal = {Advances in Engineering Software},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Gidden, Matthew J. and Carlsen, Robert W. and Flanagan, Robert R. and McGarry, Meghan B. and Opotowsky, Arrielle C. and Schneider, Erich A. and Scopatz, Anthony M. and Wilson, Paul P. H.},
      month = apr,
      year = {2016},
      keywords = {agent based modeling, Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear fuel cycle, Object orientation, Simulation, Systems analysis},
      pages = {46--59},
      file = {ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/63CHUQ54/login.html:text/html}
    }
    
  2. Andreades, Charalampos, Anselmo T. Cisneros, Jae Keun Choi, Alexandre YK Chong, Massimiliano Fratoni, Sea Hong, Lakshana R. Huddar, et al. 2016. “Design Summary of the Mark-I Pebble-Bed, Fluoride Salt–Cooled, High-Temperature Reactor Commercial Power Plant.” Nuclear Technology 195 (3): 222–38. doi:10.13182/NT16-2.

    The University of California, Berkeley (UCB), has developed a preconceptual design for a commercial pebble-bed (PB), fluoride salt–cooled, high-temperature reactor (FHR) (PB-FHR). The baseline design for this Mark-I PB-FHR (Mk1) plant is a 236-MW(thermal) reactor. The Mk1 uses a fluoride salt coolant with solid, coated-particle pebble fuel. The Mk1 design differs from earlier FHR designs because it uses a nuclear air-Brayton combined cycle designed to produce 100 MW(electric) of base-load electricity using a modified General Electric 7FB gas turbine. For peak electricity generation, the Mk1 has the ability to boost power output up to 242 MW(electric) using natural gas co-firing. The Mk1 uses direct heating of the power conversion fluid (air) with the primary coolant salt rather than using an intermediate coolant loop. By combining results from computational neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and pebble dynamics, UCB has developed a detailed design of the annular core and other key functional features. Both an active normal shutdown cooling system and a passive, natural-circulation-driven emergency decay heat removal system are included. Computational models of the FHR-validated using experimental data from the literature and from scaled thermal-hydraulic facilities-have led to a set of design criteria and system requirements for the Mk1 to operate safely and reliably. Three-dimensional, computer-aided-design models derived from the Mk1 design criteria are presented.

    @article{andreades_design_2016,
      title = {Design {Summary} of the {Mark}-{I} {Pebble}-{Bed}, {Fluoride} {Salt}–{Cooled}, {High}-{Temperature} {Reactor} {Commercial} {Power} {Plant}},
      volume = {195},
      issn = {00295450},
      url = {http://www.ans.org/pubs/journals/nt/a_38935},
      doi = {10.13182/NT16-2},
      number = {3},
      urldate = {2016-09-09},
      journal = {Nuclear Technology},
      author = {Andreades, Charalampos and Cisneros, Anselmo T. and Choi, Jae Keun and Chong, Alexandre YK and Fratoni, Massimiliano and Hong, Sea and Huddar, Lakshana R. and Huff, Kathryn D. and Kendrick, James and Krumwiede, David L. and Laufer, Michael and Munk, Madicken and Scarlat, Raluca O. and Wang, Xin and Zwiebaum, Nicolas and Greenspan, Ehud and Peterson, Per},
      month = sep,
      year = {2016},
      pages = {222--238},
      file = {Snapshot:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/BQ6TP5U7/a_38935.html:text/html;Snapshot:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/C3TI9AHZ/a_38935.html:text/html}
    }
    
  3. Wilson, Greg, D. A. Aruliah, C. Titus Brown, Neil P. Chue Hong, Matt Davis, Richard T. Guy, Steven H. D. Haddock, et al. 2014. “Best Practices for Scientific Computing.” PLoS Biol 12 (1): e1001745. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001745.

    We describe a set of best practices for scientific software development, based on research and experience, that will improve scientists’ productivity and the reliability of their software.

    @article{wilson_best_2014,
      title = {Best {Practices} for {Scientific} {Computing}},
      volume = {12},
      url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001745},
      doi = {10.1371/journal.pbio.1001745},
      number = {1},
      urldate = {2014-09-08},
      journal = {PLoS Biol},
      author = {Wilson, Greg and Aruliah, D. A. and Brown, C. Titus and Chue Hong, Neil P. and Davis, Matt and Guy, Richard T. and Haddock, Steven H. D. and Huff, Kathryn D. and Mitchell, Ian M. and Plumbley, Mark D. and Waugh, Ben and White, Ethan P. and Wilson, Paul},
      month = jan,
      year = {2014},
      keywords = {Computer Science - Mathematical Software, Computer Science - Mathematical Software, Computer Science - Software Engineering, Computer Science - Software Engineering},
      pages = {e1001745},
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    }
    
  4. Clerc, M. G., P. Cordero, J. Dunstan, Kathryn D. Huff, N. Mujica, D. Risso, and G. Varas. 2008. “Liquid-Solid-like Transition in Quasi-One-Dimensional Driven Granular Media.” Nature Physics 4 (3): 249–54. doi:10.1038/nphys884.

    The theory of non-ideal gases at thermodynamic equilibrium, for instance the van der Waals gas model, has played a central role in our understanding of coexisting phases, as well as the transitions between them. In contrast, the theory fails with granular matter because collisions between the grains dissipate energy, and their macroscopic size renders thermal fluctuations negligible. When a mass of grains is subjected to mechanical vibration, it can make a transition to a fluid state. In this state, granular matter exhibits patterns and instabilities that resemble those of molecular fluids. Here, we report a granular solid–liquid phase transition in a vibrating granular monolayer. Unexpectedly, the transition is mediated by waves and is triggered by a negative compressibility, as for van der Waals phase coexistence, although the system does not satisfy the hypotheses used to understand atomic systems. The dynamic behaviour that we observe—coalescence, coagulation and wave propagation—is common to a wide class of phase transitions. We have combined experimental, numerical and theoretical studies to build a theoretical framework for this transition.

    @article{clerc_liquid-solid-like_2008,
      title = {Liquid-solid-like transition in quasi-one-dimensional driven granular media},
      volume = {4},
      issn = {1745-2473},
      url = {http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.library.wisc.edu/10.1038/nphys884},
      doi = {10.1038/nphys884},
      number = {3},
      urldate = {2010-09-18},
      journal = {Nature Physics},
      author = {Clerc, M. G. and Cordero, P. and Dunstan, J. and Huff, Kathryn D. and Mujica, N. and Risso, D. and Varas, G.},
      month = mar,
      year = {2008},
      keywords = {KHuff},
      pages = {249--254},
      file = {Nature Snapshot:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/BW5WXVHE/nphys884.html:text/html}
    }
    

In Progress / Submitted

  1. Huff, Kathryn D. 2017. “Rapid Methods for Radionuclide Contaminant Transport in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation.” Submitted.

    Nuclear fuel cycle and and nuclear waste disposal decisions are technologically coupled. For this reason, dynamic integration of a generic disposal model with a fuel cycle systems analysis framework is necessary to illuminate performance distinctions of candidate repository host media, designs, and engineering components in the context of fuel cycle options. However, current nuclear fuel cycle simulators lack dynamic repository performance analysis due to the computational burden of high-fidelity hydrolgic contaminant transport models. To fill this capability gap, the Cyder radionuclide contaminant transport framework was developed to provide a modular simulation tool for dynamic repository performance analysis. Within this framework, medium-fidelity hydrologic radionuclide transport models were developed to support assessment appropriate for fuel cycle simulation. Rapidly modeling hundreds of waste packages in a geologic environment is enabled within this framework by a suite of four closed form models for advective, dispersive, coupled, and idealized contaminant transport. A summary of the framework and an overview of the mathematical models is presented. Additionally, parametric demonstrations simulations performed with Cyder are presented here and compared to parametric simulations with a standalone hydrologic transport model, the Clay Generic Disposal System Model developed by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy.

    @article{huff_rapid_2017,
      title = {Rapid {Methods} for {Radionuclide} {Contaminant} {Transport} in {Nuclear} {Fuel} {Cycle} {Simulation}},
      journal = {Submitted},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D.},
      year = {2017},
      keywords = {agent based modeling, Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear fuel cycle, Object orientation, Simulation, Systems analysis}
    }
    

Conference Proceedings

  1. Huff, Kathryn D., Jin Whan Bae, Kathryn A. Mummah, Robert R. Flanagan, and Anthony M. Scopatz. 2017. “Current Status of Predictive Transition Capability in Fuel Cycle Simulation.” In Proceedings of Global 2017 (Submitted). Seoul, South Korea.

    Nuclear fuel cycle simulation scenarios are most naturally described as constrained objective functions. The objectives are often systemic demands such as “achieve 1% growth for total electricity production and reach 10% uranium utilization”. The constraints take the form of nuclear fuel cycle technology availability (“reprocessing begins after 2025 and fast reactors first become available in 2050”). To match the natural constrained objective form of the scenario definition, NFC simulators must bring demand responsive deployment decisions into the dynamics of the simulation logic. In particular, a NFC simulator should have the capability to deploy supporting fuel cycle facilities to enable a demand to be met. Take, for instance, the standard once through fuel cycle. Reactors may be deployed to meet a objective power demand. However, new mines, mills, and enrichment facilities will also need to be deployed to ensure that reactors have sufficient fuel to produce power. In many simulators, the unrealistic solution to this problem is to simply have infinite capacity support facilities. Alternatively, detailing the deployment timeline of all facilities becomes the responsibility of the user. The authors seek to identify the most flexible, general, and performant algorithms applicable to this modeling challenge. Accordingly, a review was conducted of current NFC simulation tools to determine the current capabilites for demand-driven and transition scenarios. Additionally, the authors investigated promising algorithmic innovations that have been successful for similar applications in other domains such as economics and industrial engineering.

    @inproceedings{huff_current_2017,
      address = {Seoul, South Korea},
      title = {Current {Status} of {Predictive} {Transition} {Capability} in {Fuel} {Cycle} {Simulation}},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {Global} 2017 ({Submitted})},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Bae, Jin Whan and Mummah, Kathryn A. and Flanagan, Robert R. and Scopatz, Anthony M.},
      month = sep,
      year = {2017}
    }
    
  2. Bae, Jin Whan, William Roy, and Kathryn D. Huff. 2017. “Benefits of Siting a Borehole Repository at a Non-Operating Nuclear Facility.” In Proceedings of the International High Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference. Charlotte, North Carolina: American Nuclear Society.

    This work evaluates a potential solution for two pressing matters in the viability of nuclear energy: spent fuel disposal and power plants that no longer operate. The potential benefits of siting a borehole repository at a shut down nuclear power plant facility are analyzed from the perspective of myriad stake- holders. This assessment indicates that integrated siting will make economic use of the shut down power plant, take advan- tage of spent fuel handling infrastructure at those sites, mini- mize transportation costs, expedite emptying the crowded spent fuel storage pools accross the country, and will do so at sites more likely to have consenting communities.

    @inproceedings{bae_benefits_2017,
      address = {Charlotte, North Carolina},
      title = {Benefits of {Siting} a {Borehole} {Repository} at a {Non}-operating {Nuclear} {Facility}},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the {International} {High} {Level} {Radioactive} {Waste} {Management} {Conference}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society},
      author = {Bae, Jin Whan and Roy, William and Huff, Kathryn D.},
      month = apr,
      year = {2017}
    }
    
  3. Huff, Kathryn D., Massimiliano Fratoni, and Harris Greenberg. 2014. “Extensions to the Cyclus Ecosystem In Support of Market-Driven Transition Capability.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society. Anaheim, CA, United States: American Nuclear Society.

    The C YCLUS Fuel Cycle Simulator [1] is a framework for assessment of nuclear fuel cycle options. While C Y - CLUS has previously been capable of system transitions from the current fuel cycle strategy to a future option, those transitions have never previously been driven by market forces in the simulation. This summary describes a set of libraries [2] that have been contibuted to the C YCLUS framework to enable a market-driven transition analysis. This simulation framework is incomplete without a suite of dynamically loadable libraries representing the process physics of the nuclear fuel cycle (i.e. mining, fuel fabri- cation, chemical processing, transmutation, reprocessing, etc.). Within Cycamore [3], the additional modules reposi- tory within the C YCLUS ecosystem, provides some basic li- braries to represent these processes. However, extension of C YCLUS with new capabilities is community-driven, rely- ing on contributions by user-developers. The libraries con- tributed in this work are examples of such contributions.

    @inproceedings{huff_extensions_2014,
      address = {Anaheim, CA, United States},
      title = {Extensions to the {Cyclus} {Ecosystem} {In} {Support} of {Market}-{Driven} {Transition} {Capability}},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Fratoni, Massimiliano and Greenberg, Harris},
      month = nov,
      year = {2014}
    }
    
  4. Bates, Cameron, Elliot D. Biondo, Kathryn D. Huff, Kalin Kiesling, and Anthony M. Scopatz. 2014. “PyNE Progress Report.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society. Anaheim, CA, United States: American Nuclear Society.

    PyNE is a suite of free and open source (BSD licensed) tools to aid in computational nuclear science and engineer- ing. PyNE seeks to provide native implementations of com- mon nuclear algorithms, as well as an interface for the script- ing language Python and I/O support for industry standard nuclear codes and data formats. In the past year PyNE has added many features including a Rigorous 2-step Ac- tivation workflow (R2S) [1], Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) ray tracing [2], Consistent Adjoint- Weighted Importance Sampling (CADIS) variance reduction [3], and expanded ENSDF parsing support. As a part of our ongoing efforts to implement a verification and validation framework we also added continuous integration using the Build and Test Lab [4] at the University of Wisconsin. The PyNE development team has also improved PyNE’s ease of use by making binaries available for Windows, Mac, and Linux through the conda package manager as well as adding Python 3 support.

    @inproceedings{bates_pyne_2014,
      address = {Anaheim, CA, United States},
      title = {{PyNE} {Progress} {Report}},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society},
      author = {Bates, Cameron and Biondo, Elliot D. and Huff, Kathryn D. and Kiesling, Kalin and Scopatz, Anthony M.},
      month = nov,
      year = {2014}
    }
    
  5. Krumwiede, David L., C. Andreades, J.K. Choi, A.T. Cisneros, Lakshana Huddar, Kathryn D. Huff, M.D. Laufer, et al. 2014. “Design of the Mark-1 Pebble-Bed, Fluoride-Salt-Cooled, High-Temperature Reactor Commercial Power Plant.” In Proceedings of ICAPP. Charlotte, North Carolina.
    @inproceedings{krumwiede_design_2014,
      address = {Charlotte, North Carolina},
      title = {Design of the {Mark}-1 {Pebble}-{Bed}, {Fluoride}-{Salt}-{Cooled}, {High}-{Temperature} {Reactor} {Commercial} {Power} {Plant}},
      shorttitle = {Paper 14231},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {ICAPP}},
      author = {Krumwiede, David L. and Andreades, C. and Choi, J.K. and Cisneros, A.T. and Huddar, Lakshana and Huff, Kathryn D. and Laufer, M.D. and Munk, Madicken and Scarlat, Raluca O. and Seifried, Jeffrey E. and Zwiebaum, Nicolas and Greenspan, Ehud and Peterson, Per F.},
      year = {2014},
      file = {ICAPP 2014 FHR Design.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/BFMHUH6X/ICAPP 2014 FHR Design.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  6. Huff, Kathryn D., and Alexander T. Bara. 2013. “Dynamic Determination of Thermal Repository Capacity For Fuel Cycle Analysis.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, 108:123–26. Atlanta, GA, United States: American Nuclear Society.

    An algorithm and supporting database for rapid thermal repository capacity calculation implemented in Cyder, a soft- ware library for coupled thermal and hydrologic repository per- formance analysis, is described. Integration of Cyder with the Cyclus fuel cycle simulator is also described. Finally, a proof of principle demonstration is presented in which the rapid cal- culation method described here is compared with results of a more detailed model.

    @inproceedings{huff_dynamic_2013,
      address = {Atlanta, GA, United States},
      title = {Dynamic {Determination} of {Thermal} {Repository} {Capacity} {For} {Fuel} {Cycle} {Analysis}},
      volume = {108},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Bara, Alexander T.},
      month = jun,
      year = {2013},
      pages = {123--126},
      file = {trans_v108_n1_pp123-126 (1).pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/3I456PBS/trans_v108_n1_pp123-126 (1).pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  7. Gidden, Matthew, Paul Wilson, Kathryn D. Huff, and Robert W. Carlsen. 2013. “An Agent-Based Framework for Fuel Cycle Simulation with Recycling.” In Proceedings of GLOBAL. Salt Lake City, UT, United States.

    Simulation of the nuclear fuel cycle is an established field with multiple players. Prior development work has utilized tech- niques such as system dynamics to provide a solution structure for the matching of supply and demand in these simulations. In general, however, simulation infrastructure development has occured in relatively closed circles, each effort having unique considerations as to the cases which are desired to be modeled. Accordingly, individual simulators tend to have their design decisions driven by specific use cases. Presented in this work is a proposed supply and demand matching algorithm that lever- ages the techniques of the well-studied field of mathematical programming. A generic approach is achieved by treating fa- cilities as individual entities and actors in the supply-demand market which denote preferences amongst commodities. Using such a framework allows for varying levels of interaction fi- delity, ranging from low-fidelity, quick solutions to high-fidelity solutions that model individual transactions (e.g. at the fuel- assembly level). The power of the technique is that it allows such flexibility while still treating the problem in a generic man- ner, encapsulating simulation engine design decisions in such a way that future simulation requirements can be relatively easily added when needed.

    @inproceedings{gidden_agent-based_2013,
      address = {Salt Lake City, UT, United States},
      title = {An {Agent}-{Based} {Framework} for {Fuel} {Cycle} {Simulation} with {Recycling}},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {GLOBAL}},
      author = {Gidden, Matthew and Wilson, Paul and Huff, Kathryn D. and Carlsen, Robert W.},
      month = sep,
      year = {2013},
      file = {abstract.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/EGDJQBFB/abstract.pdf:application/pdf;paper.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/B5S7VPDZ/paper.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  8. Huff, Kathryn D. 2013. “Hydrologic Nuclide Transport Models in Cyder, a Geologic Disposal Software Library.” In WM2013. Phoenix, AZ: Waste Management Symposium.
    @inproceedings{huff_hydrologic_2013,
      address = {Phoenix, AZ},
      title = {Hydrologic {Nuclide} {Transport} {Models} in {Cyder}, a {Geologic} {Disposal} {Software} {Library}.},
      shorttitle = {13328},
      booktitle = {{WM}2013},
      publisher = {Waste Management Symposium},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D.},
      month = feb,
      year = {2013},
      file = {13328_corrected.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/XH8F792K/13328_corrected.pdf:application/pdf;13328.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/PDX4HEJI/13328.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  9. ———. 2013. “Cyclus Fuel Cycle Simulation Capabilities with the Cyder Disposal System Model.” In Proceedings of GLOBAL 2013. Salt Lake City, UT, United States.
    @inproceedings{huff_cyclus_2013,
      address = {Salt Lake City, UT, United States},
      title = {Cyclus {Fuel} {Cycle} {Simulation} {Capabilities} with the {Cyder} {Disposal} {System} {Model}},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {GLOBAL} 2013},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D.},
      month = oct,
      year = {2013},
      file = {cyder.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/UZJNIVM8/cyder.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  10. Huff, Kathryn, and Theodore H. Bauer. 2012. “Numerical Calibration of an Analytical Generic Nuclear Repository Heat Transfer Model.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, 106:260–63. Modeling and Simulation in the Fuel Cycle. Chicago, IL, United States: American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL 60526, United States.

    This work describes a benchmarking effort conducted to de- termine the accuracy of a new generic geology thermal repos- itory model relative to more traditional techniques and pro- poses a physically plausible auxillary thermal resistance com- ponent to improve their agreement.

    @inproceedings{huff_numerical_2012,
      address = {Chicago, IL, United States},
      series = {Modeling and {Simulation} in the {Fuel} {Cycle}},
      title = {Numerical {Calibration} of an {Analytical} {Generic} {Nuclear} {Repository} {Heat} {Transfer} {Model}},
      volume = {106},
      language = {English},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL 60526, United States},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn and Bauer, Theodore H.},
      month = jun,
      year = {2012},
      pages = {260--263},
      file = {ans2012pres.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/CX5QC6ZF/ans2012pres.pdf:application/pdf;trans_v106_n1_pp260-263.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/ICEUPH4S/trans_v106_n1_pp260-263.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  11. Huff, Kathryn D., and W. Mark Nutt. 2012. “Key Processes and Parameters in a Generic Clay Disposal System Model.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, 107:208–11. Environmental Sciences – General. San Diego, CA: American Nuclear Society. http://epubs.ans.org.ezproxy.library.wisc.edu/download/?a=14711.

    Sensitivity analysis was performed with respect to various key processes and parameters affecting long-term post-closure performance of geologic repositories in clay media. Based on the detailed computational Clay Generic Disposal Sys- tem Model (GDSM) developed by the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign [1], these results provide an overview of the relative importance of processes that affect the repository per- formance of a generic clay disposal concept model. Further analysis supports a basis for development of rapid abstracted models in the context of system level fuel cycle simulation. Processes and parameters found to influence repository perfor- mance include the rate of waste form degradation, timing of waste package failure, and various coupled geochemical and hydrologic characteristics of the natural system including dif- fusion, solubility, and advection.

    @inproceedings{huff_key_2012,
      address = {San Diego, CA},
      series = {Environmental {Sciences} -- {General}},
      title = {Key {Processes} and {Parameters} in a {Generic} {Clay} {Disposal} {System} {Model}},
      volume = {107},
      url = {http://epubs.ans.org.ezproxy.library.wisc.edu/download/?a=14711},
      language = {English},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Nutt, W. Mark},
      month = nov,
      year = {2012},
      pages = {208--211},
      file = {ans2012winterpres.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/DBZTEAGJ/ans2012winterpres.pdf:application/pdf;trans_v107_n1_pp208-211.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/SQMC825E/trans_v107_n1_pp208-211.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  12. Gidden, Matthew J., Paul P.H. Wilson, Kathryn D. Huff, and Robert W. Carlsen. 2012. “Once-Through Benchmarks with CYCLUS, a Modular, Open-Source Fuel Cycle Simulator.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, 107:264–66. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Resources, Sustainability, Reuse, and Recycle. San Diego, CA: American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL 60526, United States.

    The C YCLUS project, based at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, is an open source platform for exploring the long- term impact of alternative nuclear fuel cycles. The C YCLUS core provides the infrastructure for an agent-based approach, allowing user-provided modules to define the behavior of fuel cycle facilities as they interact to exchange materials. An im- portant consequence of this approach is that innovative facility and material exchange concepts can be introduced to a consis- tent framework allowing for more rigorous comparison. The C YCLUS team has recently grown and now incorporates a vari- ety of expertise: output visualization capability through collab- oration with the University of Utah, server-client communica- tion via the University of Idaho, input visualization and control with the University of Texas - Austin, and social communica- tion expertise through collaborators at UW-Madison to assist the mission-critical goal of relevancy vis-à-vis policy makers. Accordingly, the C YCLUS project is expanding efforts in the realms of both structural capability and benchmarking calcula- tions. A series of once-through fuel cycle scenarios are being con- ducted using the C YCLUS core and accompanying modules. Where needed, additional modules have been added, includ- ing a region model that intelligently makes building decisions given a demand function. The results of these scenarios are then compared with VISION [1] to provide a benchmark of the C YCLUS results.

    @inproceedings{gidden_once-through_2012,
      address = {San Diego, CA},
      series = {Nuclear {Fuel} {Cycle} {Resources}, {Sustainability}, {Reuse}, and {Recycle}},
      title = {Once-{Through} {Benchmarks} with {CYCLUS}, a {Modular}, {Open}-{Source} {Fuel} {Cycle} {Simulator}},
      volume = {107},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL 60526, United States},
      author = {Gidden, Matthew J. and Wilson, Paul P.H. and Huff, Kathryn D. and Carlsen, Robert W.},
      month = nov,
      year = {2012},
      pages = {264--266},
      file = {trans_v107_n1_pp264-266 (1).pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/SMGXZFGK/trans_v107_n1_pp264-266 (1).pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  13. Scopatz, Anthony, Paul K. Romano, Paul P. H. Wilson, and Kathryn D. Huff. 2012. “PyNE: Python for Nuclear Engineering.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society. Vol. 107. San Diego, CA, USA: American Nuclear Society.

    PyNE, or ‘Python for Nuclear Engineering’ 1 , is a nascent free and open source C++/Cython/Python package for perform- ing common nuclear engineering tasks. This is intended as a base level tool kit - akin to SciPy or Biopython - for common algorithms in the nuclear science and engineering domain. The remainer of this paper is composed of a discussion of the difficulties which prevented PyNE from being written earlier, a listing of the first cut capabilities, and a description of why PyNE has thus far been successful and what future features are currently planned.

    @inproceedings{scopatz_pyne:_2012,
      address = {San Diego, CA, USA},
      title = {{PyNE}: {Python} for {Nuclear} {Engineering}},
      volume = {107},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society},
      author = {Scopatz, Anthony and Romano, Paul K. and Wilson, Paul P. H. and Huff, Kathryn D.},
      month = nov,
      year = {2012},
      file = {trans_v107_n1_pp985-987.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/TQ9E3XGC/trans_v107_n1_pp985-987.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  14. Huff, Kathryn D. 2011. “Cyclus: An Open, Modular, Next Generation Fuel Cycle Simulator Platform (Poster).” In Proceedings of the Waste Management Symposium. Phoenix, AZ.

    CYCLUS is a top-level, next generation, nuclear fuel cycle simulation framework designed with an open development process and modular platform. It employs lessons learned from previous efforts to pursue quantitative assessment of worldwide nuclear energy production, material flows, energy costs, environmental impact, proliferation resistance, and robustness against supply disruption.

    @inproceedings{huff_cyclus:_2011,
      address = {Phoenix, AZ},
      title = {Cyclus: {An} {Open}, {Modular}, {Next} {Generation} {Fuel} {Cycle} {Simulator} {Platform} (poster)},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the {Waste} {Management} {Symposium}},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D.},
      month = mar,
      year = {2011},
      file = {WM2011.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/ID9PP8PC/WM2011.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  15. Huff, Kathryn D., Paul PH Wilson, and Matthew J. Gidden. 2011. “Open Architecture and Modular Paradigm of Cyclus, a Fuel Cycle Simulation Code.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, 104:183.

    The C YCLUS project at the University of Wisconsin - Madi- son is the result of lessons learned from experience with pre- vious nuclear fuel cycle simulation platforms. The modeling paradigm follows the transacation of discrete quanta of ma- terial among discrete facilities, arranged in a geographic and institutional framework, and trading in flexible markets. Key concepts in the design of C YCLUS include open access to the simulation engine, modularity with regard to functionality, and relevance to both scientific and policy analyses. The combina- tion of modular encapsulation within the software architec- ture and an open development paradigm allows for a bal- ance between collaboration at multiple levels of simulation detail and security of proprietary or sensitive data. When comparing different nuclear fuel cycle concepts, it can be a challenge to find any two systems analyses that com- pare across a common set of metrics with a similar set of un- derlying assumptions. Each analysis is likely to focus on a set of metrics that are of interest to the team performing the analy- sis and involve both implicit and explicit assumptions and con- straints about the behavior of the fuel cycle system. While a strict prescription of these metrics, assumptions and con- straints could be proposed for comparison purposes, another solution is to provide a systems analysis simulation tool that provides sufficient modularity, extensibility and open access, that it can be a basis for harmonzing to a common set. If it becomes easier to modify an existing simulation tool to sup- port the needs of a new analysis than it is to develop a new tool, then it is possible that such a tool will be adopted more universally for such analysis.

    @inproceedings{huff_open_2011,
      title = {Open {Architecture} and {Modular} {Paradigm} of {Cyclus}, a {Fuel} {Cycle} {Simulation} {Code}},
      volume = {104},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Wilson, Paul PH and Gidden, Matthew J.},
      month = jun,
      year = {2011},
      pages = {183},
      file = {cyclusANS2011pres.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/H5VT3BKD/cyclusANS2011pres.pdf:application/pdf;trans_v104_n1_pp183-184.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/HJPWVTI8/trans_v104_n1_pp183-184.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  16. Huff, Kathryn D., A.M. Scopatz, N.D. Preston, and P.P.H. Wilson. 2011. “Rapid Peer Education of a Computational Nuclear Engineering Skill Suite.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, 104:103–4. Training, Human Performance, and Work Force Development. Hollywood, FL, United States: American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL 60526, United States.

    Detailed reactor models, massively parallelized calculations, and enormously collaborative simulation projects are increas- ingly integral to nuclear engineering. However, the quality and caliber of this work is limited by a workforce lacking formal training in a software development skill suite that is becom- ing increasingly essential. To address this unmet need, The Hacker Within (THW), a student organization at the University of Wisconsin, has developed a series of short courses address- ing best practices such as version control and test driven code development, as well as basic skills such as UNIX mobility. These ’Boot Camps’ seek to provide time efficient introduc- tions to essential programming languages and tools without turning “biochemists and mechanical engineers into computer scientists.”[1][2]

    @inproceedings{huff_rapid_2011,
      address = {Hollywood, FL, United States},
      series = {Training, {Human} {Performance}, and {Work} {Force} {Development}},
      title = {Rapid {Peer} {Education} of a {Computational} {Nuclear} {Engineering} {Skill} {Suite}},
      volume = {104},
      language = {English},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL 60526, United States},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Scopatz, A.M. and Preston, N.D. and Wilson, P.P.H.},
      month = jun,
      year = {2011},
      keywords = {Computer Science, Education, Models, Reactor, Software, The Hacker Within (THW)},
      pages = {103--104},
      file = {Rapid Peer Education Nuclear Engineering.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/V438NNXC/Rapid Peer Education Nuclear Engineering.pdf:application/pdf;thwANS2011pres.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/4CW3QC9Q/thwANS2011pres.pdf:application/pdf;trans_v104_n1_pp103-104.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/MF3BA6DB/trans_v104_n1_pp103-104.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  17. Huff, Kathryn D., Royal A. Elmore, Kyle M. Oliver, and Paul P.H. Wilson. 2010. “MOX Fuel Recipe Approximation Tests in GENIUSv2.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society Student Meeting. Ypsilanti, MI.

    The GENIUS project (Global Evaluation of Nuclear Infrastructure Utilization Scenarios) was conceived as the top-level nuclear enterprise simulation tool in the Simulation Institute for Nuclear Enterprise Modelling and Analysis (SINEMA) framework1. The current version, GENIUSv2, is an object-oriented C++ application with Python-based pre- and post-processing. The GENIUSv2 tool proposes to inform nuclear fuel cycle technology and policy by providing a richly detailed, modular platform capable of dynamically modeling complexly integrated international fuel cycles such as those involving separations and reprocessing schemes. Here we present results of the GENIUSv2 testing suite which demonstrate neutronics weighting methods for approximating optimal mixed oxide fuel compositions. These weighting methods achieve various levels of success at assembling critical fuel recipes from separated spent fuel streams for fuel cycles incorporating mixed oxide reprocessing. Results of neutronics constraining and neutronics weighting methods are here compared and alternative linear programmatic formulations are proposed for determining mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel compositions from available material.

    @inproceedings{huff_mox_2010,
      address = {Ypsilanti, MI},
      title = {{MOX} {Fuel} {Recipe} {Approximation} {Tests} in {GENIUSv}2},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society} {Student} {Meeting}},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Elmore, Royal A. and Oliver, Kyle M. and Wilson, Paul P.H.},
      month = apr,
      year = {2010},
      file = {ansStudent10RAP.doc:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/V8G5DB2Z/ansStudent10RAP.doc:application/msword}
    }
    
  18. Huff, Kathryn D., K. M Oliver, P. P.H Wilson, Tae W. Ahn, K. Dunn, and R. Elmore. 2009. “GENIUSv2 Discrete Facilities/Materials Modeling of International Fuel Cycle Robustness.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, 101:239–40. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Codes and Applications. Washington D.C., United States: American Nuclear Society.

    The GENIUS project (Global Evaluation of Nuclear Infrastructure Utilization Scenarios) was conceived as the top-level nuclear enterprise simulation tool in the Simulation Institute for Nuclear Enterprise Modeling and Analysis (SINEMA) framework 1 . The current version, GENIUSv2, is an object-oriented C++ application with Python-based pre- and post-processing. The GENIUSv2 fuel cycle tool proposes to inform nuclear fuel cycle technology and policy by providing a richly detailed, modular platform capable of dynamically modeling inter-regional and inter-institutional relationships and incorporating user-defined, facility specific technologies. Here we present results from the GENIUSv2 testing suite demonstrating the detailed, robust and modular nature of its modeling capability and computational methodology.

    @inproceedings{huff_geniusv2_2009,
      address = {Washington D.C., United States},
      series = {Nuclear {Fuel} {Cycle} {Codes} and {Applications}},
      title = {{GENIUSv}2 {Discrete} {Facilities}/{Materials} {Modeling} of {International} {Fuel} {Cycle} {Robustness}},
      volume = {101},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      publisher = {American Nuclear Society},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Oliver, K. M and Wilson, P. P.H and Ahn, Tae W. and Dunn, K. and Elmore, R.},
      month = nov,
      year = {2009},
      keywords = {C++, Code, Fuel Cycle, Geniusv2, Global Evaluation of Nuclear Infrastructure Utilization Scenarios (GENIUS), Simulation, Technology},
      pages = {239--240},
      file = {2009_11_Huff-ANS2009Winter_Genius.doc:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/BD4FSDRE/2009_11_Huff-ANS2009Winter_Genius.doc:application/msword;2009_11_Huff_ANS2009Winter_Genius.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/2CEI63AX/2009_11_Huff_ANS2009Winter_Genius.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  19. Huff, Kathryn D., Paul P.H. Wilson, and Kyle M. Oliver. 2009. “GENIUS Version 2: Modeling the Worldwide Nuclear Fuel Cycle (Poster).” In Proceedings of the EHub Conference. University of Wisconsin, Madison.
    @inproceedings{huff_genius_2009,
      address = {University of Wisconsin, Madison},
      title = {{GENIUS} {Version} 2: {Modeling} the {Worldwide} {Nuclear} {Fuel} {Cycle} (poster)},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the {eHub} {Conference}},
      author = {Huff, Kathryn D. and Wilson, Paul P.H. and Oliver, Kyle M.},
      month = nov,
      year = {2009}
    }
    
  20. Elmore, R. A, K. M Oliver, P. P.H Wilson, Tae Wook Ahn, Kerry L. Dunn, and Kathryn D. Huff. 2009. “GENIUSv2 Recipe Approximation Methodology for Mixed-Oxide Fuel.” In Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, 101:241–42. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Codes and Applications. Washington D.C., United States.

    The Simulation Institute for Nuclear Enterprise Modeling and Analysis (SINEMA) developed the GENIUS (Global Evaluation of Nuclear Infrastructure Utilization Scenarios) project as the umbrella nuclear fuel cycle simulation package 1 . GENIUSv2 is the next iteration and is an object-oriented C++ program using Python pre- and post-processing wrappers. As a package, GENIUSv2 supports dynamic modeling of regional and institutional interactions of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, using a discrete material/discrete facility paradigm. The engineering calculations and analysis needed for each different facility and process are handled by separate modules within GENIUSv2. Results from the GENIUSv2 separations module are presented that detail the robust approximation methodology for creating mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel recipes from available separated material.

    @inproceedings{elmore_geniusv2_2009,
      address = {Washington D.C., United States},
      series = {Nuclear {Fuel} {Cycle} {Codes} and {Applications}},
      title = {{GENIUSv}2 {Recipe} {Approximation} {Methodology} for {Mixed}-{Oxide} {Fuel}},
      volume = {101},
      booktitle = {Transactions of the {American} {Nuclear} {Society}},
      author = {Elmore, R. A and Oliver, K. M and Wilson, P. P.H and Ahn, Tae Wook and Dunn, Kerry L. and Huff, Kathryn D.},
      month = nov,
      year = {2009},
      keywords = {C++, Code, GENIUS (Global Evaluation of Nuclear Infrastrucutre Utilization Scenarios), Mixed-Oxide Fuel (MOX), Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities, Simulation Institute for Nuclear Enterprise Modeling and Analysis (SINEMA)},
      pages = {241--242},
      file = {2009_11_Elmore-ANS2009Winter_Genius.doc:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/7G53PPN8/2009_11_Elmore-ANS2009Winter_Genius.doc:application/msword;2009_11_Elmore_ANS2009Winter_Genius.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/SPK8GUTS/2009_11_Elmore_ANS2009Winter_Genius.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  21. Oliver, Kyle M., Paul P.H. Wilson, Arnaud Reveillere, Tae Wook Ahn, Kerry Dunn, Kathryn D. Huff, and Royal A. Elmore. 2009. “Studying International Fuel Cycle Robustness with the GENIUSv2 Discrete Facilities/Materials Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis Tool.” In Proceedings of GLOBAL 2009. GLOBAL 2009: Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles and Systems. Paris, France.
    @inproceedings{oliver_studying_2009,
      address = {Paris, France},
      series = {{GLOBAL} 2009: {Advanced} {Nuclear} {Fuel} {Cycles} and {Systems}},
      title = {Studying international fuel cycle robustness with the {GENIUSv}2 discrete facilities/materials fuel cycle systems analysis tool},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {GLOBAL} 2009},
      author = {Oliver, Kyle M. and Wilson, Paul P.H. and Reveillere, Arnaud and Ahn, Tae Wook and Dunn, Kerry and Huff, Kathryn D. and Elmore, Royal A.},
      month = sep,
      year = {2009},
      keywords = {Capacity, Discrete Facility/ Discrete Model (DF/DM), Geniusv2, Mass Flow Data, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis Tool},
      file = {2009_9_Oliver-GENIUS-GLOBAL2009-abstract.doc:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/UQM8PS63/2009_9_Oliver-GENIUS-GLOBAL2009-abstract.doc:application/msword;2009_9_Oliver-GENIUS-GLOBAL2009-proceedings.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/NUX2KS8H/2009_9_Oliver-GENIUS-GLOBAL2009-proceedings.pdf:application/pdf;2009_9_Oliver-GENIUS-GLOBAL2009-submission.doc:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/7VZ5TN97/2009_9_Oliver-GENIUS-GLOBAL2009-submission.doc:application/msword;2009_9_Oliver-GENIUS-GLOBAL2009-submission.pdf:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/AUWFJWRA/2009_9_Oliver-GENIUS-GLOBAL2009-submission.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
    
  22. Mujica, Nicolas, Marcel Clerc, Patricio Cordero, Jocelyn Dunstan, Kathryn D. Huff, Loreto Oyarte, Rodrigo Soto, German Varas, and Dino Risso. 2008. “Solid-Liquid-like Transition in Vibrated Granular Monolayers.” In APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting Abstracts. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..DFD.HM008M.

    The theory of non-ideal gases in thermodynamic equilibrium, for instance the van der Waals gas model, has played a central role in the understanding of coexisting phases. Here, we report a combined experimental, numerical and theoretical study of a liquid-solid-like phase transition which takes place in a vertically vibrated fluidized granular monolayer. The first experimental setup is a long, narrow channel, with a width of the order of a few particle diameters, hence the dynamics is quasi-one-dimensional. We have considered this configuration to characterize the dynamic behavior of the phase transition. The second setup is used to measure the pressure as function of particle density in order to clarify the physical mechanism behind this phase transition. We demonstrate that the transition is mediated by waves and that it is triggered by a negative compressibility as in van der Waals phase coexistence, although the system does not satisfy the hypotheses used to understand atomic systems. Finally, in order to further characterize this phase transition, we study static and dynamic correlation functions, and bond-orientational order parameters.

    @inproceedings{mujica_solid-liquid-like_2008,
      title = {Solid-liquid-like transition in vibrated granular monolayers},
      url = {http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..DFD.HM008M},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2014-10-10},
      booktitle = {{APS} {Division} of {Fluid} {Dynamics} {Meeting} {Abstracts}},
      author = {Mujica, Nicolas and Clerc, Marcel and Cordero, Patricio and Dunstan, Jocelyn and Huff, Kathryn D. and Oyarte, Loreto and Soto, Rodrigo and Varas, German and Risso, Dino},
      month = nov,
      year = {2008},
      keywords = {KHuff},
      file = {Snapshot:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/4GI7D9UA/2008APS..DFD.html:text/html;Solid-liquid-like transition in vibrated granular monolayers:/home/huff/.zotero/zotero/m4c2d0jp.default/zotero/storage/WUM5GTPK/2008APS..DFD.html:text/html}
    }
    
  23. Rochman, D., R. C. Haight, S. A. Wender, J. M. O’Donnell, A. Michaudon, Kathryn D. Huff, D. J. Vieira, et al. 2005. “First Measurements with a Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometer at LANSCE.” In Proceedings of the International Conference on Nuclear Data for Science and Technology, 769:736–39. doi:10.1063/1.1945112.

    The characteristics of a Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometer (LSDS) installed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) are presented in this paper. This instrument is designed to study neutron-induced fission on ultra small quantities of actinides, on the order of tens of nanograms or less. The measurements of the energy-time relation, energy resolution and neutron flux are compared to simulations performed with MCNPX. Results on neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu with tens of micrograms and tens of nanograms, respectively, are presented. Finally, a digital filter designed to improve the detection of fission events at short time after the proton pulses is described.

    @inproceedings{rochman_first_2005,
      title = {First {Measurements} with a {Lead} {Slowing}-{Down} {Spectrometer} at {LANSCE}},
      volume = {769},
      isbn = {0094-243X},
      url = {http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AIPC..769..736R},
      doi = {10.1063/1.1945112},
      urldate = {2014-10-10},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the {International} {Conference} on {Nuclear} {Data} for {Science} and {Technology}},
      author = {Rochman, D. and Haight, R. C. and Wender, S. A. and O'Donnell, J. M. and Michaudon, A. and Huff, Kathryn D. and Vieira, D. J. and Bond, E. and Rundberg, R. S. and Kronenberg, A. and Wilhelmy, J. and Bredeweg, T. A. and Schwantes, J. and Ethvignot, T. and Granier, T. and Petit, M. and Danon, Y.},
      month = may,
      year = {2005},
      keywords = {=A, 220{\textless}, Neutron-induced fission, Nucleon-induced reactions, Spectrometers and spectroscopic techniques},
      pages = {736--739}
    }